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Cruise Offer

Roundtrip Toronto
8-night Arctic Express Canada: the Heart of the Northwest Passage Expedition
August 13, 2023
Quark Expeditions: Ultramarine
Roundtrip Toronto
Vacation Offer ID 1438603
Reference this number when contacting our travel specialist.
Limited Availability
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Exclusive Offer
  • $300 per Couple Polar Boutique Credit
Overview
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Ship Info
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Staterooms
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Deckplans
The Signature Collection – Exclusive Amenities
The Signature Collection Sailings offer Exceptional Value and Exclusive Amenities.

Cruise Inclusions

  • Leadership throughout your voyage by our experienced Expedition Leaders, including shore landings and other activities
  • All Zodiac transfers and cruising as per the daily program
  • All shore landings as per the daily program
  • Shipboard accommodation with daily housekeeping
  • All meals, snacks, soft drinks and juices on board throughout your voyage (Please inform us of any dietary requirements as far in advance as possible. Unfortunately, the ships’ galleys cannot prepare kosher meals.)
  • Select beer and wine during dinner; and coffee, tea and cocoa available around the clock
  • Formal and informal presentations by our Expedition Team and guest speakers as scheduled
  • A photographic journal documenting the expedition
  • A pair of waterproof expedition boots on loan for landings and Zodiac cruising excursions
  • An official Quark Expeditions® parka to keep
  • Hair dryer and bathrobes in every cabin
  • All miscellaneous service taxes and port charges throughout the program
  • All luggage handling aboard the ship
  • Emergency Evacuation insurance for all passengers to a maximum benefit of USD $500,000 per person

Available Add-Ons

Optional airfare; pre-/post-cruise hotel
8-night Arctic Express Canada: the Heart of the Northwest Passage Expedition
  • Destination Guide
  • Suggested Shore Excursions
Destination Arrival Departure
Toronto

Toronto 08/13/2023

Your Arctic expedition begins in Toronto. Explore this vibrant city on your own before spending the night enjoying the comfort and amenities of your designated hotel.,
08/13/2023 08/13/2023
Toronto

Toronto 08/14/2023

This morning, board your charter flight to Resolute, Nunavut. Upon arrival, you will be transferred to your ship via Zodiac or helicopter (depending on ship location and weather conditions).,
08/14/2023 08/14/2023
Air Travel

Air Travel 08/14/2023

This morning, board your charter flight to Resolute, Nunavut. Upon arrival, you will be transferred to your ship via Zodiac or helicopter (depending on ship location and weather conditions).,
08/14/2023 08/14/2023
Cruise Starts (Embarkation)

Cruise Starts (Embarkation) 08/14/2023

This morning, board your charter flight to Resolute, Nunavut. Upon arrival, you will be transferred to your ship via Zodiac or helicopter (depending on ship location and weather conditions).,
08/14/2023 08/14/2023
Resolute

Resolute 08/14/2023

This morning, board your charter flight to Resolute, Nunavut. Upon arrival, you will be transferred to your ship via Zodiac or helicopter (depending on ship location and weather conditions).,
08/14/2023 08/14/2023
Beechey Island
08/15/2023 08/15/2023
Nunavut (Croker Bay)
08/16/2023 08/16/2023
Dundas Harbour
08/17/2023 08/17/2023
Coburg Island
08/18/2023 08/18/2023
Arctic Bay

Arctic Bay 08/19/2023

Winding your way around the remote islands of the Canadian High Arctic aboard Ultramarine, the newest ship in Quark fleet, you'll navigate the same icy inlets, channels, and bays that fascinated legendary explorers of long ago as they searched for the fabled Northwest Passage, the great sea route at the top of the world. Designed to give polar adventurers unprecedented access to the hardest-to-reach places on the planet—and equipped with two onboard twin-engine helicopters for unparalleled access to areas only Quark Expeditions can bring you—this one-of-a-kind ship will take you beyond the familiar in polar exploration. Throughout your journey, your Expedition Team will work hard to give you a taste of the best the Canadian Arctic has to offer, immersing you in the heart of the Northwest Passage in under a week. While this waterway is known to European cultures as the Northwest Passage, these lands and waters have nurtured and sustained the Inuit and their predecessors who have called these shores home for almost 5,000 years. Moving through these remote landscapes you will be traveling through the ancestral homelands of this ancient culture, illuminated by Inuit guides onboard and ashore. Nunavut is an Inuktitut word meaning "our land" and the Nunavummiut (the people of Nunavut) are renowned for their incredible resourcefulness, hospitality, good humor, and a deep knowledge of the land and animals that has allowed them to thrive in the far north for millennia. Remote and rich in history, the Canadian High Arctic is as awe inspiring as it is informative. Your days spent exploring this mysterious region will have you traveling back in time to the Age of Exploration. While following in the footsteps of famous explorers like Sir John Franklin and Roald Amundsen, you'll navigate the waters and visit the historic sites in the area around Lancaster Sound that were key to the discovery of the Northwest Passage. You'll also learn about the scientific, cultural, geopolitical, and environmental aspects of the route from our world-class experts, guides, and the local communities. Reaching remote lands that have lured adventurers for centuries will be an experience you'll never forget. Wildlife sightings are almost guaranteed, as many of the areas we hope to explore are home to a surprising number of birds and mammals that thrive in this challenging environment. You may see polar bears, muskoxen, and several bird species, such as gyrfalcons and dovekies (little auks). If you're lucky, you may even spot the elusive narwhal or a bowhead whale, though sightings of these iconic creatures in the wild are rare, even in places where we have the greatest chances of encountering them. Coburg Island, for instance, is a wildlife reserve for such birds as snowy owls and peregrine falcons, while the impressive vertical cliffs of Prince Leopold Island are dotted with nesting seabirds like northern fulmars and black guillemots. The sheltered shores and steep cliffs of Arctic Bay, a hamlet located in Admiralty Inlet, provide an ideal nesting habitat for various High Arctic birds such as thick-billed murres (Brünnich's guillemots) and kittiwakes. This community, whose inhabitants' ancestors have lived a traditional Inuit nomadic lifestyle in the region for almost 5,000 years, is also an ideal spot to go ashore and learn more about the Inuit culture, sampling the local cuisine and mingling with artists, perhaps picking up carvings or other handicrafts as a memento of your polar adventure. Devon Island is another possible locale for wildlife encounters, as walrus, polar bears, and muskoxen inhabit the area, which is also the location of the remains of a Royal Canadian Mounted Police outpost, established at Dundas Harbour in 1924 to curb foreign whaling and other activities. Here you'll find a small cemetery, one of Canada's most northerly, still maintained by the RCMP to this day. Another exciting excursion your Expedition Team might offer, conditions permitting, is the opportunity to fly up to explore the Devon ice cap, one of the largest in the Canadian Arctic. At the western end of Devon Island, windswept Beechey Island might be small, but it's steeped in history, as its broad shore and safe anchorage made a suitable stopover for Arctic expeditions. You'll want to pay your respects to the ill-fated Franklin expedition of 1845–46 at the small marked graves of three crew members on the island, one of Canada's most significant historical sites. This is also where Norwegian Roald Amundsen stopped to pay his own respects to his childhood hero, Franklin, during his 1903–06 voyage, which became the first successful transit of the Northwest Passage. History buffs will be further intrigued by the chance to explore an abandoned Hudson's Bay Company trading post at Fort Ross, at the southern end of Somerset Island. Fort Ross is at the eastern entrance of Bellot Strait. One of the goals of this expedition is to transit this famous channel, one of the most narrow and challenging of the passage. If we're successful, at the midpoint you'll sail past Zenith Point, the northernmost point of continental North America. Named for Frenchman Joseph Bellot, one of several explorers who set out in the 1850s to search for Franklin's doomed expedition, the strait separates Somerset Island from the Boothia Peninsula on mainland Canada. (On Beechey Island, you can visit the memorial to Bellot, who disappeared during his search for Franklin.) Those looking for even more excitement may have the opportunity to cruise by Zodiac along the face of an active glacier near Croker Bay, Devon Island, and possibly even witness the wonder of calving ice, at a safe distance. Listen closely for the steady crackle and loud roars as pieces of ice break off and crash into the water below. You'll also want to be on the lookout for the walrus that are often seen in the area. There is no shortage of natural beauty, wildlife, and history in Canada's High Arctic. Each day, you'll discover something new and inspiring, whether it is admiration of the tundra flora that survive here, a rare bird species soaring overhead, a polar bear on the hunt in its natural habitat, or the ancient remains of a Thule dwelling, ancestors of the Inuit. Remember that no two polar voyages are alike, since each expedition presents new opportunities and different weather and ice conditions. While this voyage has no fixed itinerary, our objective is to visit as many of the incredible highlights the season has to offer, using the opportunities provided by the weather and ice to give you the best experience. Each day, your highly skilled Expedition Team will read the conditions and choose the best course to set, but despite their extensive expertise in these areas, each visit brings something new to discover. That said, our expeditions will have some elements in common, including daily Zodiac cruising, land excursions, a robust education program, a community visit and wildlife viewing opportunities. And thanks to our onboard helicopters, you'll also discover the ultimate polar expedition experience: as stunning as polar landscapes are from your ship, they're even more striking from the air! Conditions permitting, you'll enjoy ultra-immersive activities like flightseeing (short sightseeing flights around your ship and surrounding areas) and heli-landings (flying to places we could not otherwise access), two breathtaking options that are unique to Ultramarine and give you an exhilarating polar experience like no other.,
08/19/2023 08/19/2023
Prince Leopold Island

Prince Leopold Island 08/19/2023

Winding your way around the remote islands of the Canadian High Arctic aboard Ultramarine, the newest ship in Quark fleet, you'll navigate the same icy inlets, channels, and bays that fascinated legendary explorers of long ago as they searched for the fabled Northwest Passage, the great sea route at the top of the world. Designed to give polar adventurers unprecedented access to the hardest-to-reach places on the planet—and equipped with two onboard twin-engine helicopters for unparalleled access to areas only Quark Expeditions can bring you—this one-of-a-kind ship will take you beyond the familiar in polar exploration. Throughout your journey, your Expedition Team will work hard to give you a taste of the best the Canadian Arctic has to offer, immersing you in the heart of the Northwest Passage in under a week. While this waterway is known to European cultures as the Northwest Passage, these lands and waters have nurtured and sustained the Inuit and their predecessors who have called these shores home for almost 5,000 years. Moving through these remote landscapes you will be traveling through the ancestral homelands of this ancient culture, illuminated by Inuit guides onboard and ashore. Nunavut is an Inuktitut word meaning "our land" and the Nunavummiut (the people of Nunavut) are renowned for their incredible resourcefulness, hospitality, good humor, and a deep knowledge of the land and animals that has allowed them to thrive in the far north for millennia. Remote and rich in history, the Canadian High Arctic is as awe inspiring as it is informative. Your days spent exploring this mysterious region will have you traveling back in time to the Age of Exploration. While following in the footsteps of famous explorers like Sir John Franklin and Roald Amundsen, you'll navigate the waters and visit the historic sites in the area around Lancaster Sound that were key to the discovery of the Northwest Passage. You'll also learn about the scientific, cultural, geopolitical, and environmental aspects of the route from our world-class experts, guides, and the local communities. Reaching remote lands that have lured adventurers for centuries will be an experience you'll never forget. Wildlife sightings are almost guaranteed, as many of the areas we hope to explore are home to a surprising number of birds and mammals that thrive in this challenging environment. You may see polar bears, muskoxen, and several bird species, such as gyrfalcons and dovekies (little auks). If you're lucky, you may even spot the elusive narwhal or a bowhead whale, though sightings of these iconic creatures in the wild are rare, even in places where we have the greatest chances of encountering them. Coburg Island, for instance, is a wildlife reserve for such birds as snowy owls and peregrine falcons, while the impressive vertical cliffs of Prince Leopold Island are dotted with nesting seabirds like northern fulmars and black guillemots. The sheltered shores and steep cliffs of Arctic Bay, a hamlet located in Admiralty Inlet, provide an ideal nesting habitat for various High Arctic birds such as thick-billed murres (Brünnich's guillemots) and kittiwakes. This community, whose inhabitants' ancestors have lived a traditional Inuit nomadic lifestyle in the region for almost 5,000 years, is also an ideal spot to go ashore and learn more about the Inuit culture, sampling the local cuisine and mingling with artists, perhaps picking up carvings or other handicrafts as a memento of your polar adventure. Devon Island is another possible locale for wildlife encounters, as walrus, polar bears, and muskoxen inhabit the area, which is also the location of the remains of a Royal Canadian Mounted Police outpost, established at Dundas Harbour in 1924 to curb foreign whaling and other activities. Here you'll find a small cemetery, one of Canada's most northerly, still maintained by the RCMP to this day. Another exciting excursion your Expedition Team might offer, conditions permitting, is the opportunity to fly up to explore the Devon ice cap, one of the largest in the Canadian Arctic. At the western end of Devon Island, windswept Beechey Island might be small, but it's steeped in history, as its broad shore and safe anchorage made a suitable stopover for Arctic expeditions. You'll want to pay your respects to the ill-fated Franklin expedition of 1845–46 at the small marked graves of three crew members on the island, one of Canada's most significant historical sites. This is also where Norwegian Roald Amundsen stopped to pay his own respects to his childhood hero, Franklin, during his 1903–06 voyage, which became the first successful transit of the Northwest Passage. History buffs will be further intrigued by the chance to explore an abandoned Hudson's Bay Company trading post at Fort Ross, at the southern end of Somerset Island. Fort Ross is at the eastern entrance of Bellot Strait. One of the goals of this expedition is to transit this famous channel, one of the most narrow and challenging of the passage. If we're successful, at the midpoint you'll sail past Zenith Point, the northernmost point of continental North America. Named for Frenchman Joseph Bellot, one of several explorers who set out in the 1850s to search for Franklin's doomed expedition, the strait separates Somerset Island from the Boothia Peninsula on mainland Canada. (On Beechey Island, you can visit the memorial to Bellot, who disappeared during his search for Franklin.) Those looking for even more excitement may have the opportunity to cruise by Zodiac along the face of an active glacier near Croker Bay, Devon Island, and possibly even witness the wonder of calving ice, at a safe distance. Listen closely for the steady crackle and loud roars as pieces of ice break off and crash into the water below. You'll also want to be on the lookout for the walrus that are often seen in the area. There is no shortage of natural beauty, wildlife, and history in Canada's High Arctic. Each day, you'll discover something new and inspiring, whether it is admiration of the tundra flora that survive here, a rare bird species soaring overhead, a polar bear on the hunt in its natural habitat, or the ancient remains of a Thule dwelling, ancestors of the Inuit. Remember that no two polar voyages are alike, since each expedition presents new opportunities and different weather and ice conditions. While this voyage has no fixed itinerary, our objective is to visit as many of the incredible highlights the season has to offer, using the opportunities provided by the weather and ice to give you the best experience. Each day, your highly skilled Expedition Team will read the conditions and choose the best course to set, but despite their extensive expertise in these areas, each visit brings something new to discover. That said, our expeditions will have some elements in common, including daily Zodiac cruising, land excursions, a robust education program, a community visit and wildlife viewing opportunities. And thanks to our onboard helicopters, you'll also discover the ultimate polar expedition experience: as stunning as polar landscapes are from your ship, they're even more striking from the air! Conditions permitting, you'll enjoy ultra-immersive activities like flightseeing (short sightseeing flights around your ship and surrounding areas) and heli-landings (flying to places we could not otherwise access), two breathtaking options that are unique to Ultramarine and give you an exhilarating polar experience like no other.,
08/19/2023 08/19/2023
Fort Ross

Fort Ross 08/19/2023

Winding your way around the remote islands of the Canadian High Arctic aboard Ultramarine, the newest ship in Quark fleet, you'll navigate the same icy inlets, channels, and bays that fascinated legendary explorers of long ago as they searched for the fabled Northwest Passage, the great sea route at the top of the world. Designed to give polar adventurers unprecedented access to the hardest-to-reach places on the planet—and equipped with two onboard twin-engine helicopters for unparalleled access to areas only Quark Expeditions can bring you—this one-of-a-kind ship will take you beyond the familiar in polar exploration. Throughout your journey, your Expedition Team will work hard to give you a taste of the best the Canadian Arctic has to offer, immersing you in the heart of the Northwest Passage in under a week. While this waterway is known to European cultures as the Northwest Passage, these lands and waters have nurtured and sustained the Inuit and their predecessors who have called these shores home for almost 5,000 years. Moving through these remote landscapes you will be traveling through the ancestral homelands of this ancient culture, illuminated by Inuit guides onboard and ashore. Nunavut is an Inuktitut word meaning "our land" and the Nunavummiut (the people of Nunavut) are renowned for their incredible resourcefulness, hospitality, good humor, and a deep knowledge of the land and animals that has allowed them to thrive in the far north for millennia. Remote and rich in history, the Canadian High Arctic is as awe inspiring as it is informative. Your days spent exploring this mysterious region will have you traveling back in time to the Age of Exploration. While following in the footsteps of famous explorers like Sir John Franklin and Roald Amundsen, you'll navigate the waters and visit the historic sites in the area around Lancaster Sound that were key to the discovery of the Northwest Passage. You'll also learn about the scientific, cultural, geopolitical, and environmental aspects of the route from our world-class experts, guides, and the local communities. Reaching remote lands that have lured adventurers for centuries will be an experience you'll never forget. Wildlife sightings are almost guaranteed, as many of the areas we hope to explore are home to a surprising number of birds and mammals that thrive in this challenging environment. You may see polar bears, muskoxen, and several bird species, such as gyrfalcons and dovekies (little auks). If you're lucky, you may even spot the elusive narwhal or a bowhead whale, though sightings of these iconic creatures in the wild are rare, even in places where we have the greatest chances of encountering them. Coburg Island, for instance, is a wildlife reserve for such birds as snowy owls and peregrine falcons, while the impressive vertical cliffs of Prince Leopold Island are dotted with nesting seabirds like northern fulmars and black guillemots. The sheltered shores and steep cliffs of Arctic Bay, a hamlet located in Admiralty Inlet, provide an ideal nesting habitat for various High Arctic birds such as thick-billed murres (Brünnich's guillemots) and kittiwakes. This community, whose inhabitants' ancestors have lived a traditional Inuit nomadic lifestyle in the region for almost 5,000 years, is also an ideal spot to go ashore and learn more about the Inuit culture, sampling the local cuisine and mingling with artists, perhaps picking up carvings or other handicrafts as a memento of your polar adventure. Devon Island is another possible locale for wildlife encounters, as walrus, polar bears, and muskoxen inhabit the area, which is also the location of the remains of a Royal Canadian Mounted Police outpost, established at Dundas Harbour in 1924 to curb foreign whaling and other activities. Here you'll find a small cemetery, one of Canada's most northerly, still maintained by the RCMP to this day. Another exciting excursion your Expedition Team might offer, conditions permitting, is the opportunity to fly up to explore the Devon ice cap, one of the largest in the Canadian Arctic. At the western end of Devon Island, windswept Beechey Island might be small, but it's steeped in history, as its broad shore and safe anchorage made a suitable stopover for Arctic expeditions. You'll want to pay your respects to the ill-fated Franklin expedition of 1845–46 at the small marked graves of three crew members on the island, one of Canada's most significant historical sites. This is also where Norwegian Roald Amundsen stopped to pay his own respects to his childhood hero, Franklin, during his 1903–06 voyage, which became the first successful transit of the Northwest Passage. History buffs will be further intrigued by the chance to explore an abandoned Hudson's Bay Company trading post at Fort Ross, at the southern end of Somerset Island. Fort Ross is at the eastern entrance of Bellot Strait. One of the goals of this expedition is to transit this famous channel, one of the most narrow and challenging of the passage. If we're successful, at the midpoint you'll sail past Zenith Point, the northernmost point of continental North America. Named for Frenchman Joseph Bellot, one of several explorers who set out in the 1850s to search for Franklin's doomed expedition, the strait separates Somerset Island from the Boothia Peninsula on mainland Canada. (On Beechey Island, you can visit the memorial to Bellot, who disappeared during his search for Franklin.) Those looking for even more excitement may have the opportunity to cruise by Zodiac along the face of an active glacier near Croker Bay, Devon Island, and possibly even witness the wonder of calving ice, at a safe distance. Listen closely for the steady crackle and loud roars as pieces of ice break off and crash into the water below. You'll also want to be on the lookout for the walrus that are often seen in the area. There is no shortage of natural beauty, wildlife, and history in Canada's High Arctic. Each day, you'll discover something new and inspiring, whether it is admiration of the tundra flora that survive here, a rare bird species soaring overhead, a polar bear on the hunt in its natural habitat, or the ancient remains of a Thule dwelling, ancestors of the Inuit. Remember that no two polar voyages are alike, since each expedition presents new opportunities and different weather and ice conditions. While this voyage has no fixed itinerary, our objective is to visit as many of the incredible highlights the season has to offer, using the opportunities provided by the weather and ice to give you the best experience. Each day, your highly skilled Expedition Team will read the conditions and choose the best course to set, but despite their extensive expertise in these areas, each visit brings something new to discover. That said, our expeditions will have some elements in common, including daily Zodiac cruising, land excursions, a robust education program, a community visit and wildlife viewing opportunities. And thanks to our onboard helicopters, you'll also discover the ultimate polar expedition experience: as stunning as polar landscapes are from your ship, they're even more striking from the air! Conditions permitting, you'll enjoy ultra-immersive activities like flightseeing (short sightseeing flights around your ship and surrounding areas) and heli-landings (flying to places we could not otherwise access), two breathtaking options that are unique to Ultramarine and give you an exhilarating polar experience like no other.,
08/19/2023 08/19/2023
Nunavut (Bellot Strait)

Nunavut (Bellot Strait) 08/19/2023

Winding your way around the remote islands of the Canadian High Arctic aboard Ultramarine, the newest ship in Quark fleet, you'll navigate the same icy inlets, channels, and bays that fascinated legendary explorers of long ago as they searched for the fabled Northwest Passage, the great sea route at the top of the world. Designed to give polar adventurers unprecedented access to the hardest-to-reach places on the planet—and equipped with two onboard twin-engine helicopters for unparalleled access to areas only Quark Expeditions can bring you—this one-of-a-kind ship will take you beyond the familiar in polar exploration. Throughout your journey, your Expedition Team will work hard to give you a taste of the best the Canadian Arctic has to offer, immersing you in the heart of the Northwest Passage in under a week. While this waterway is known to European cultures as the Northwest Passage, these lands and waters have nurtured and sustained the Inuit and their predecessors who have called these shores home for almost 5,000 years. Moving through these remote landscapes you will be traveling through the ancestral homelands of this ancient culture, illuminated by Inuit guides onboard and ashore. Nunavut is an Inuktitut word meaning "our land" and the Nunavummiut (the people of Nunavut) are renowned for their incredible resourcefulness, hospitality, good humor, and a deep knowledge of the land and animals that has allowed them to thrive in the far north for millennia. Remote and rich in history, the Canadian High Arctic is as awe inspiring as it is informative. Your days spent exploring this mysterious region will have you traveling back in time to the Age of Exploration. While following in the footsteps of famous explorers like Sir John Franklin and Roald Amundsen, you'll navigate the waters and visit the historic sites in the area around Lancaster Sound that were key to the discovery of the Northwest Passage. You'll also learn about the scientific, cultural, geopolitical, and environmental aspects of the route from our world-class experts, guides, and the local communities. Reaching remote lands that have lured adventurers for centuries will be an experience you'll never forget. Wildlife sightings are almost guaranteed, as many of the areas we hope to explore are home to a surprising number of birds and mammals that thrive in this challenging environment. You may see polar bears, muskoxen, and several bird species, such as gyrfalcons and dovekies (little auks). If you're lucky, you may even spot the elusive narwhal or a bowhead whale, though sightings of these iconic creatures in the wild are rare, even in places where we have the greatest chances of encountering them. Coburg Island, for instance, is a wildlife reserve for such birds as snowy owls and peregrine falcons, while the impressive vertical cliffs of Prince Leopold Island are dotted with nesting seabirds like northern fulmars and black guillemots. The sheltered shores and steep cliffs of Arctic Bay, a hamlet located in Admiralty Inlet, provide an ideal nesting habitat for various High Arctic birds such as thick-billed murres (Brünnich's guillemots) and kittiwakes. This community, whose inhabitants' ancestors have lived a traditional Inuit nomadic lifestyle in the region for almost 5,000 years, is also an ideal spot to go ashore and learn more about the Inuit culture, sampling the local cuisine and mingling with artists, perhaps picking up carvings or other handicrafts as a memento of your polar adventure. Devon Island is another possible locale for wildlife encounters, as walrus, polar bears, and muskoxen inhabit the area, which is also the location of the remains of a Royal Canadian Mounted Police outpost, established at Dundas Harbour in 1924 to curb foreign whaling and other activities. Here you'll find a small cemetery, one of Canada's most northerly, still maintained by the RCMP to this day. Another exciting excursion your Expedition Team might offer, conditions permitting, is the opportunity to fly up to explore the Devon ice cap, one of the largest in the Canadian Arctic. At the western end of Devon Island, windswept Beechey Island might be small, but it's steeped in history, as its broad shore and safe anchorage made a suitable stopover for Arctic expeditions. You'll want to pay your respects to the ill-fated Franklin expedition of 1845–46 at the small marked graves of three crew members on the island, one of Canada's most significant historical sites. This is also where Norwegian Roald Amundsen stopped to pay his own respects to his childhood hero, Franklin, during his 1903–06 voyage, which became the first successful transit of the Northwest Passage. History buffs will be further intrigued by the chance to explore an abandoned Hudson's Bay Company trading post at Fort Ross, at the southern end of Somerset Island. Fort Ross is at the eastern entrance of Bellot Strait. One of the goals of this expedition is to transit this famous channel, one of the most narrow and challenging of the passage. If we're successful, at the midpoint you'll sail past Zenith Point, the northernmost point of continental North America. Named for Frenchman Joseph Bellot, one of several explorers who set out in the 1850s to search for Franklin's doomed expedition, the strait separates Somerset Island from the Boothia Peninsula on mainland Canada. (On Beechey Island, you can visit the memorial to Bellot, who disappeared during his search for Franklin.) Those looking for even more excitement may have the opportunity to cruise by Zodiac along the face of an active glacier near Croker Bay, Devon Island, and possibly even witness the wonder of calving ice, at a safe distance. Listen closely for the steady crackle and loud roars as pieces of ice break off and crash into the water below. You'll also want to be on the lookout for the walrus that are often seen in the area. There is no shortage of natural beauty, wildlife, and history in Canada's High Arctic. Each day, you'll discover something new and inspiring, whether it is admiration of the tundra flora that survive here, a rare bird species soaring overhead, a polar bear on the hunt in its natural habitat, or the ancient remains of a Thule dwelling, ancestors of the Inuit. Remember that no two polar voyages are alike, since each expedition presents new opportunities and different weather and ice conditions. While this voyage has no fixed itinerary, our objective is to visit as many of the incredible highlights the season has to offer, using the opportunities provided by the weather and ice to give you the best experience. Each day, your highly skilled Expedition Team will read the conditions and choose the best course to set, but despite their extensive expertise in these areas, each visit brings something new to discover. That said, our expeditions will have some elements in common, including daily Zodiac cruising, land excursions, a robust education program, a community visit and wildlife viewing opportunities. And thanks to our onboard helicopters, you'll also discover the ultimate polar expedition experience: as stunning as polar landscapes are from your ship, they're even more striking from the air! Conditions permitting, you'll enjoy ultra-immersive activities like flightseeing (short sightseeing flights around your ship and surrounding areas) and heli-landings (flying to places we could not otherwise access), two breathtaking options that are unique to Ultramarine and give you an exhilarating polar experience like no other.,
08/19/2023 08/19/2023
Resolute

Resolute 08/20/2023

After disembarking in the Inuit hamlet of Resolute, you'll be transferred to your charter flight to Toronto, where you'll spend the night at your included hotel.,
08/20/2023 08/20/2023
Cruise Ends (Debarkation)

Cruise Ends (Debarkation) 08/20/2023

After disembarking in the Inuit hamlet of Resolute, you'll be transferred to your charter flight to Toronto, where you'll spend the night at your included hotel.,
08/20/2023 08/20/2023
Air Travel

Air Travel 08/20/2023

After disembarking in the Inuit hamlet of Resolute, you'll be transferred to your charter flight to Toronto, where you'll spend the night at your included hotel.,
08/20/2023 08/20/2023
Toronto

Toronto 08/20/2023

After disembarking in the Inuit hamlet of Resolute, you'll be transferred to your charter flight to Toronto, where you'll spend the night at your included hotel.,
08/20/2023 08/20/2023
Toronto

Toronto 08/21/2023

Today, make your way to the airport to catch your homeward flights, or spend the day exploring this fascinating city.,
08/21/2023 08/21/2023
Quark Expeditions: Ultramarine

The newest ship in our fleet, Ultramarine is designed to go beyond the familiar in polar exploration, to discover new places, and immerse you in the best the region has to offer.

Equipped with two twin-engine helicopters, Ultramarine offers the most robust portfolio of adventure activities in the industry, the most spacious suites in its category, breathtaking public spaces, and more outdoor wildlife viewing spaces than other expedition ships its size. It also features a best-in-class 70-day operational range and an innovative mix of sustainability features that exceed all industry standards.

With all this and more, Ultramarine is set to deliver the ultimate polar expedition experience.

Ship Statistics
Year Built
2020
Year Refurbished
Year Entered Present Fleet
Previous Name
Country of Registry
Tonnage (GRT)
10000
Guests (Lowers)
206
Total Guests
199
Passenger Decks
7
Number of Crew
140
Officers' Nationality
Cruise/Hotel Staff Nationality
Total Rooms
103
Suites
95
Balconies
–
Ocean/River View
8
Interior
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Accessible
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Information provided within these pages has been updated as of July 2019. While we do our best to ensure that stateroom descriptions and deckplans appearing in this website are complete and accurate, we cannot be responsible for inaccurate representations, which may or may not be under our control. Please reconfirm stateroom accommodations and deck placement prior to booking.

Suite

Ultra Suite Limited Availability
  • Deck 6

Located on Deck 6, with approximately 563 sq. ft. (52.3m2) of interior living space, and a 46 sq. ft. (4.3 m2) balcony. This suite is perfect for guests who want to travel without compromise. Our largest and most luxurious suite features the most sleeping, entertainment and storage space onboard the ship. It is perfect for families or travelers who want all the comforts of home onboard the ship.

Features: one double or two single beds in a private bedroom with walk-in closet, sitting area with sofa bed and additional walk-in hallway closet, private balcony, desk, refrigerator, TV, private bathroom with shower, bathtub and heated floors and separate powder room.

Owner's Suite Limited Availability
  • Deck 6

Located on Deck 6, with approximately 446 sq. ft. (41.4 m2) of indoor living space and a 46.3 sq. ft. (4.3 m2) balcony. This suite is perfect for guests who want it all. A large, luxurious suite featuring a private bedroom, full bathroom, powder room, and two separate living spaces. This suite is perfect for families or couples who want all the comforts of home onboard the ship.

Features: one double or two single beds in a private bedroom with walk-in closet, sitting area with sofa bed and additional closet, private balcony, desk, refrigerator, TV, private bathroom with shower, bathtub and heated floors and separate powder room.

Penthouse Suite Limited Availability
  • Deck 7

The only suite category to be located on Deck 7, with approximately 369 sq. ft. (34.3 m2) of indoor living space,  and a 67 sq. ft. (6.2 m2) balcony. This suite is perfect for guests wanting to wake up to unobstructed polar views from the warmth and comfort of their bed onboard the ship. These suites offer the best of everything—views, spacious interiors, full bathrooms and generous balcony sizes—as well as easy access to the wellness centre.

Features: one double or two single beds, sitting area with sofa bed, private balcony, desk, refrigerator, TV, private bathroom with shower, bathtub and heated floors.

Terrace Suite Limited Availability
  • Deck 6

Located on Deck 6, with approximately 350 sq. ft. (32.5 m2) of indoor living space, and a 100 sq. ft. (9.3 m2) balcony. This suite is perfect for guests wanting generous interiors with a wide layout and the largest balconies on the ship. Centrally located on Deck 6, guests will enjoy minimal movement and motion from the comfort of these suites.

Features: one double or two single beds, sitting area with sofa bed, private extra-wide balcony, desk, refrigerator, TV, private bathroom with shower, bathtub and heated floors.

Deluxe Balcony Suite Limited Availability
  • Deck 6
  • Deck 4

Located on Decks 4 and 6, with approximately 299 sq. ft. (27.8 m2) of indoor living space, and a 70 sq. ft. (6.5 m2) balcony. This suite is perfect for guests wanting a larger living space, full bathroom, and a substantial balcony. Deluxe Balcony Suites are the first suite type to offer additional privacy in the bathroom with an enclosed toilet, a full bath and shower to make it easier for guests to get ready together in the morning.

Features: one double or two single beds, sitting area with sofa bed, private balcony, desk, refrigerator, TV, private bathroom with shower, bathtub and heated floors.

Balcony Suite Limited Availability
  • Deck 6
  • Deck 4

Located on Decks 4 and 6, with approximately 226 sq. ft. (21 m2) of indoor living space, and a 52 sq. ft. (4.8 m2) balcony, this entry-level balcony suite is one of the largest available on a ship of this class. This suite is perfect for guests who are looking for both indoor and outdoor living spaces. There are four connecting suites in this category, making this an excellent option for families or groups wanting to stay connected to each other during their expedition.

Features: one double or two single beds, sitting area with sofa bed, private balcony, desk, refrigerator, TV, private bathroom with shower and heated floors.

Explorer Suite Limited Availability
  • Deck 3

Located on Deck 3, and approximately 285 sq. ft. (26.5 m2). These suites are perfect for people traveling together or solo guests looking to share with like-minded individuals. This suite maximizes interior living space while still offering guests the opportunity to stay connected to the outdoors. Our entry-level twin suites are the largest available on a ship of this class.

Features: one double or two single beds, sitting area with sofa bed, picture window, desk, refrigerator, TV, private bathroom with shower and heated floors.

Oceanview

Explorer Triple Limited Availability
  • Deck 3

Located on Deck 3, and approximately 285 sq. ft. (26.5 m2). This suite is perfect for guests traveling solo who want to share their experience with other like-minded travelers of the same gender, or for groups of three traveling together. Featuring three separate single beds, and amenities for each of the three guests.

Features: three single beds (two of which can be combined into a double bed), sitting area, picture window, desk, refrigerator, TV, private bathroom with shower and heated floors.

Solo Panorama Limited Availability
  • Deck 6

Located on Deck 6, and approximately 132 sq. ft. (12.3 m2). This suite is perfect for solo guests who appreciate privacy and want to wake up to sweeping views from the comfort of their bed. These are the only solo suites with floor-to-ceiling windows available onboard any ship in its class.

Features: single bed, floor-to-ceiling window, desk, refrigerator, TV, private bathroom with shower and heated floors.

All fares are per person, based on double occupancy (unless otherwise noted) and quoted in US dollars (US$). Rates for expeditions, flights, as well as optional pre-expedition and post-expedition extensions are based on tariffs and exchange rates in effect at the time of printing and are subject to change prior to departure. Substantial changes in tariffs, exchange rates and the price of fuel, services and labor sometimes increase the cost of expedition arrangements significantly. Quark reserves the right to alter prices or introduce surcharges accordingly, even if payment has been received in full. All travelers are required to pay for their excursion and additional purchases in conjunction with their excursion in the same currency. The fare does not include tobacco, alcoholic or special beverages (bottled or tap), miscellaneous extras, personal needs or medical care. Such goods and services, if available for purchase aboard the vessel/camp, are at the traveler's own expense. Payment for all such goods and services including any charges for extra baggage must be made in cash or by traveler's checks in US dollars (or other currency acceptable to the carrier) upon demand by the carrier prior to the traveler's disembarkation. Taxes, port charges, embarkation and loading expenses, stamps, health fees and any other charges whatsoever imposed by governmental authorities in any port or place shall be for the account of the traveler if not included in the fare paid to Quark.

To confirm reservations on all Quark products, a deposit of 20% (minimum US$1000 per person) is required at time of booking. The deposit may be paid by bank wire transfer, check, money order or major credit card. For any booking within 120 days of departure full payment is required. Final payment balances are due 120 days prior to departure.

Important reminder: Embracing the unexpected is part of the legacy – and excitement – of expedition travel. There are no guarantees that we can achieve everything we set out to accomplish. A measure of flexibility is something all of us must bring to a voyage. There are nearly 200 recognized sites in the Antarctic Peninsula and South Shetlands and the places mentioned above may be changed to others equally as interesting.

Exlusions - Rates specifically do not include:

  • Any airfare unless otherwise specified in the itinerary.
  • Passport and visa expenses.
  • Government arrival and departure taxes.
  • Any meals ashore with the exception of breakfast at the host hotel before embarkation and lunch on specified fly and cruise programs.
  • Baggage, cancellation and medical travel insurance.
  • Excess baggage charges.
  • Laundry, bar, beverage and other personal charges unless specified.
  • Telecommunications charges.
  • The voluntary gratuity at the end of the voyage for shipboard staff and crew.
  • Massage services.

All fares are quoted in US Dollars.

Deck 8

Stateroom Key

  • Ultra Suite ()
  • Owner's Suite ()
  • Penthouse Suite ()
  • Terrace Suite ()
  • Deluxe Balcony Suite ()
  • Balcony Suite ()
  • Explorer Suite ()
  • Explorer Triple ()
  • Solo Panorama ()
Deck 7

Stateroom Key

  • Ultra Suite ()
  • Owner's Suite ()
  • Penthouse Suite ()
  • Terrace Suite ()
  • Deluxe Balcony Suite ()
  • Balcony Suite ()
  • Explorer Suite ()
  • Explorer Triple ()
  • Solo Panorama ()
Deck 6

Stateroom Key

  • Ultra Suite ()
  • Owner's Suite ()
  • Penthouse Suite ()
  • Terrace Suite ()
  • Deluxe Balcony Suite ()
  • Balcony Suite ()
  • Explorer Suite ()
  • Explorer Triple ()
  • Solo Panorama ()
Deck 5

Stateroom Key

  • Ultra Suite ()
  • Owner's Suite ()
  • Penthouse Suite ()
  • Terrace Suite ()
  • Deluxe Balcony Suite ()
  • Balcony Suite ()
  • Explorer Suite ()
  • Explorer Triple ()
  • Solo Panorama ()
Deck 4

Stateroom Key

  • Ultra Suite ()
  • Owner's Suite ()
  • Penthouse Suite ()
  • Terrace Suite ()
  • Deluxe Balcony Suite ()
  • Balcony Suite ()
  • Explorer Suite ()
  • Explorer Triple ()
  • Solo Panorama ()
Deck 3

Stateroom Key

  • Ultra Suite ()
  • Owner's Suite ()
  • Penthouse Suite ()
  • Terrace Suite ()
  • Deluxe Balcony Suite ()
  • Balcony Suite ()
  • Explorer Suite ()
  • Explorer Triple ()
  • Solo Panorama ()
Deck 2

Stateroom Key

  • Ultra Suite ()
  • Owner's Suite ()
  • Penthouse Suite ()
  • Terrace Suite ()
  • Deluxe Balcony Suite ()
  • Balcony Suite ()
  • Explorer Suite ()
  • Explorer Triple ()
  • Solo Panorama ()